We'll be ready rain or shine!

We'll be ready rain or shine!

Our members are gearing up for the 2015 Plant Sale. We're planning digs and displays, creating plant lists and collecting choice garden-related rummage. 

 

 

 

 

Ever wonder what happens to the money from our Plant Sale?

Check out this informative graphic to find out what happens to the money we make at our annual plant sale (click to enlarge):

What Does Soil pH Tell You?

The Garden Club will again have URI Master Gardener Soil Testers at our sale, doing pH testing. What does knowing the pH of your soil tell you? This handy fact sheet from West Virginia University (pdf file) lists common garden and houseplants and what their preferred pH range is. For example, hydrangeas like it acidic, with a pH of 4.5, while wisteria likes it sweet, with a pH in the range of 6.75 to 7.5.

Free Soil Testing for Connecticut Residents

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Stations in New Haven and Windsor offer free comprehensive soil tests to Connecticut residents. You can find out how to take a sample, and where to send your sample, at their website. We will also have this information at the “Ask a Master Gardener” booth at our plant sale.

The Importance of Soil Testing

trowel-color.jpg

Why should you test your soil?

(This year, the garden club will have URI Master Gardener soil testing experts at our Plant Sale. See below for information on how to take a sample to bring to the Sale for testing.) Getting a soil test, whether you are growing vegetables, flowers, or a lawn, is the most important test that you can do to achieve the best results. Trained Master Gardeners will evaluate the texture and the pH of your soil sample and provide you with advice on how to improve your growing conditions, if that is necessary. In addition, the Master Gardeners will offer advice on any gardening, lawn care or tree problem you may have.

I want to bring a soil sample to the Plant Sale. How do I take a sample?

Using a clean trowel, take and combine several smaller samples in each separate area of your property that you want to test at the depth of 3-4" for lawn, 6-8" for vegetables and flowers and 12 -18" for fruit trees. Do not sample recently fertilized, limed, or very wet soil. You can take the sample from different parts of the lawn or the garden.

Take approximately one cup of soil and spread it on a piece of paper to dry overnight.

Transfer the sample to a small zip-lock bag. Write on the bag with a Sharpie your name and the type of plants you grow or want to grow in that area of your yard and bring it to the Sale.